The Invisible Man question answers and book pdf






 Q.1 Write in about 100 words the character sketch of:

 1. Mrs. Hall: Mrs. Hall Is the wife of Mr. Hall and the owner of the Coach and Horses Inn. A very friendly, down-to-earth woman who enjoys socialising with her guests, Mrs. Hall is continually frustrated by the mysterious Invisible Man's refusal to talk with her, and his repeated temper tantrums. The Halls are a typical family. Mr. Hall drinks and Mrs. Hall nags him about drinking. Mr. Hall isn't so quick and Mrs. Hall takes out her frustrations on Millie, the serving girl. Mrs. Hall, although not a major character, is revealed as rather devious in a harmless sort of way. She really wants to know what the strange man's disfigurement is; she assumes he has been in a horrible accident, and the motherly side of her wants to know how to express sympathy. She is a very good innkeeper under the circumstances. 

2. Mr. Teddy Henfrey: A clock repairman who happens to visit the inn for a cup of tea. Mrs. Hall takes advantage of him to try to find out about her strange guest. She wants Teddy Henfrey to fix a clock in the stranger's room. Teddy deliberately takes as long as he can with the clock, taking it apart and re-assembling it for no reason. He tries unsuccessfully to engage the stranger in conversation. The stranger catches him wasting time, though and tells him to finish up and get out. Because the stranger will not talk, Teddy convinces himself that the man is someone of a "suspicious" nature. He begins the rumours about the man being wanted by the police and merely wrapping himself up to conceal his identity. Teddy Henfrey is a character typical of the other people of the town. He wants to know the man's story, and when he is rebuffed for his persistence, he begins to imagine all sorts of things. His imagination soon becomes fact to him, and he spreads his knowledge to anyone who will care to listen. 

3. Dr. Cuss: Dr. Cuss is a doctor living in the town of Iping. Intrigued by tales of a bandaged stranger staying at the Coach and Hoses Inn, Dr. Cuss goes to see him under the pretense of asking for a donation to the nurse's fund. The strange man, Griffin, scares Cuss away by pinching his nose with his invisible hand. Cuss went immediately to see Rev. Bunting, who not surprisingly did not believe the doctor's wild story. Later, after Griffin had been exposed as The Invisible Man, Dr. Cuss and Rev. Bunting got hold of his notebooks, but these were stolen back from them by the invisible Griffin, who took both men's clothes. Although the unlucky Rev. Bunting had all his clothing stolen by Griffin, Dr. Cuss only lost his trousers.


4. Rev. Bunting : The Rev. Bunting is the vicar in the town of Iping. Dr. Cuss want to see him following his first encounter with Griffin. Bunting laughed at Cuss' claims of an invisible hand pinching his nose, but the next night his home was burgled by the Invisible Man himself. Later, Bunting and Cuss tried to read Griffin's notes but were stopped by the Invisible Man, who stole their clothes. Although Cuss escaped missing only his trousers, Bunting had his entire wardrobe purloined. 

5. Mr. Sandy Wadgers: Mr. Sandy Wadgers was the village blacksmith, who is also supposed to be an exorcist. He was the one whom people thought, the one who could deal with the ghosts and spirits. Mr & Mrs. Hall sent Millie across the street through the golden five o'clock sunshine to rouse up Mr. Sandy Wadgers, the blacksmith. He was a knowing man, and very resourceful person. He took quite a grave view of the case. "I am surprised if that is not witchcraft" was the view of Mr. Sandy Wadgers. "Do you want horseshoes for the ghosts." He came round greatly concerned. They wanted him to lead the way upstairs to the room, but he didn't seem to be in any hurry. Wadgers is joined by Huxter, and together they ponder the likelihood of witchcraft and contemplate the propriety of breaking through the door in order to examine the situation more closely. However, before they can carry out any such action, the door opens and the stranger emerges, wrapped and bundled as usual. He enters the parlour and slam the door against them. When Mr. Hall raps on the door and demands an explanation, the stranger tells him to "go to the devil "and "shut the door after you." Wadgers delays "breaking" into the room, using the excuse of propriety when the real and very human reason is fear and apprehension. While they may talk of spirits and witchcraft in their leisure, it is clear that they have no real experience with such things.

 6. Griffin : The story of the Invisible Man, is the story of a protagonist Griffin, who had been a brilliant young chemist and researcher. Unfortunately, he began his road to 'decline' in college when he became extremely obsessed with his experiments, that he kept his work in a clandestine manner lest someone else claimed credit for that. His passion for pure scientific investigation accelerated to such an extent that when he required money for further research, he stole it from his father. And later, in a fit of anger and frustration, he even murdered him. The barberous crime thus committed made rest of his crimes pale in comparison. He turns himself from scientist to fanatic when he starts focusing all his attention merely on the concept of invisibility and never ever thinks of the repercussions that may follow. He may not have had any intention initially trying the potion on himself, but the interference of his landlord and prying neighbour lady instigate him to experiment on himself. Once he becomes invisible, his life becomes miserable. At the close of the novel poetic justice is done, Griffin is seized, assaulted and killed by a mob. The invisible Man's naked, battered body gradually becomes visible as he dies. 



7. Thomas Marvel: Thomas Marvel is a tramp unwittingly recruited as a scapegoat to assist the Invisible Man as his partner in the deeds causing panic. He is short, fat and a loner. He is the area tramp. Thomas Marvel carries the Invisible Man's scientific 
notebooks and stolen money. Eventually Marvel grows afraid of his unseen partner and flees to Port Burdock. He also confiscates both the notebooks and the money with him where he seeks police protection. Seeing through his intentions and misgivings, the Invisible Man gets infuriated and vows to avenge Marvel, but he becomes preoccupied with hiding from the law and retaliating against Dr. Kemp, and in the process Marvel is spared. Marvel feels blessed with the stolen money and the notes of the Invisible Man. He opens his own Inn and names it 'The Invisible Man' and prospers too. The novel ends with him secretly 'marvelling' at Griffin's notes. He is indeed the man of the world who behaves as an opportunist to take advantage of his circumstances to thrive in life. 

8. George Hall: George Hall, the husband of Mrs. Hall, is a simple innocent folk, assisting his wife in the Inn. Couch and Horses Inn. He is the first person in Iping to suspect the mysterious Griffin. When a dog bites Griffin and tears his glove and nips his trousers, it was George Hall who follows him to see if he was alright but he was taken aback when he saw a handless arm, waving towards him, slam the door in his face and locked. 

9. Mr. Huxter: Huxter, the shop owner, sees this guy Marvel waiting outside a window of the Coach and Horses inn holding a bag. Marvel walks into inn and nervously enters the parlour. Mr. Hall shouts that this is a private room, causing Marvel to rush out in panic. He then enters the bar and steadies himself with a drink. Marvel walks outside and stands near the parlour window, appearing to smoke a pipe. However, his hands are shaking, and Mr. Huxter's suspicious are aroused. Marvel suddenly goes into the yard, and Mr. Huxter is certain he is up to something unlawful. He rushes out and finds that Marvel has taken a bundle tied in a blue tablecloth and three books. So Huxter runs after the guy, yelling "Thief!" But, before he can catch the man, something (the Invisible Man) trips Huxter and knocks him out. 

10. The Old Mariner (Sailor): When Marvel had been sitting for the best part of an hour, an elderly mariner, carrying a newspaper, came out of the inn and sat down beside him. The mariner in Port Stowe has one job here, which is t tell us that the Invisible Man story is in all newspapers. Later the mariner hears another fantastic storythat of money floating along a wall in butterfly fashion. The story is true, however. The sailor thinks the story in the newspapers is believable because it comes equipped with names and details.

 11. Doctor Kemp: Doctor Kemp is a scientist living in the town of Port Burdock. He is an old friend of Griffin, who comes to his house to hide after Griffin's transformation into the "Invisible Man." Kemp has a hard time accepting the fact that his friend, who he had not seen for years, suddenly appears uninvited and invisible, but eventually he overcomes his shock and sits down and talks with Griffin. Narrative-wise, Kemp then allows Griffin to relate the story of how he began his experiments, and all that happened 




to him between his arrival on his old friend's doorstep and then. Kemp, realizing that Griffin is insane with power, is quick to summon Colonel Adye of the Port Burdock police. Adye fails to apprehend Griffin, who escapes and brands Kemp a traitor, vowing to kill him. Kemp's attitude is representative of the average established, self-confident, and self-sufficient individual. He sees a man in trouble, but his reaction is contemptuous instead of concern. He has heard warning cries about an Invisible Man, but clearly doesn't believe any of it. He is a man who keeps himself apart from the concerns of the general public, is buried in his work, interested only in what award it will ultimately bring him.